Audio quality - Is it the method or the tools

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Audio quality - Is it the method or the tools

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So in my clumsy set up I record my audio script using audible then play it back while screen capturing my presentation recording the system audio. It seems to work fairly well allowing me to dub the audio over the video.

 

Becuase the scripts are fairly long I end up recording in block segments and then merge them into one file. However I am getting a lot of (justified) reviews saying the audio quality is inconsistant and could be improved. I use audible to smooth the quality and normalise it but there is still room for improvement.

 

I suspect its because I am using a basic microphone (suitable for skype and video calls). I am keen to know if I were to invest in a decent microphone (blue yeti or similar) would this improve audio quality.

 

Is it the tool or the method thats causing me grief - keen to get peoples thoughts?

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Re: Audio quality - Is it the method or the tools

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@JAust10 

I think audio is one of the hardest things to get right. It is influenced by so many factors: your mic, your recording device, your environment, your voice, etc. 

After doing a lot of research, a lot of testing, and buying a LOT of different mics, I've nailed it down to two things: get the best microphone you can afford and position it as close as possible to your face (within reason, of course). 

I recommend that you spend time researching what will work best for your environment. Is it an open space? Is there background noise? Will your face be in the video, if so, do you want the mic to be visible or not? If your face is not in the video, then it's a lot easier. Do you have a recording device other than a computer (USB vs audio jack vs XLR)? 

My videos show my face, and I didn't want a visible mic, so I have a shotgun mic. I have also added sound dampening tiles in my studio and played with a lot of different settings on my H4N to record. I think the results are good as I get compliments from students. 

Best of luck to you! 

Greg Reverdiau - Airplane and Drone Training

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Re: Audio quality - Is it the method or the tools

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@JAust10 

I think audio is one of the hardest things to get right. It is influenced by so many factors: your mic, your recording device, your environment, your voice, etc. 

After doing a lot of research, a lot of testing, and buying a LOT of different mics, I've nailed it down to two things: get the best microphone you can afford and position it as close as possible to your face (within reason, of course). 

I recommend that you spend time researching what will work best for your environment. Is it an open space? Is there background noise? Will your face be in the video, if so, do you want the mic to be visible or not? If your face is not in the video, then it's a lot easier. Do you have a recording device other than a computer (USB vs audio jack vs XLR)? 

My videos show my face, and I didn't want a visible mic, so I have a shotgun mic. I have also added sound dampening tiles in my studio and played with a lot of different settings on my H4N to record. I think the results are good as I get compliments from students. 

Best of luck to you! 

Greg Reverdiau - Airplane and Drone Training

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Re: Audio quality - Is it the method or the tools

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Audio is the most important part of the delivery.

Location:
Find a place with little outside noise, or choose a time to record when it is quieter.
Make sure your space has a little echo. Reduce this by being close to the microphone and avoid hard surfaces.  Hanging blankets, curtains or clothes will deaden the echo. This is why some people record in their clothes cupboard/closet.
Microphone:
Keep it close to your mouth but not too close that you can hear you breathing in.
Use a microphone you can afford. A simple USB one does well.
Avoid laptop built-in microphones when all you can hear is the CPU fan.

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A/V Solutions
Figure out how to create the best audio and visual set-up for your price point and skill level. This is a great place to chat about different mics, green screens, video editing software, and more.