low number of courses and high demand

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low number of courses and high demand

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Dear Sir, 

                  I have searched a lot on udemy insight but have not found any courses which are low in number and high in demand. 

   Can you please let me know as to which subjects are low in number and high in demand?

                                                                                    Regards

 

 

 

 

Asif kamal
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Re: low number of courses and high demand

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I disagree with the approach the others have stated. As a businessman, I find that having a quality product or service is AT MOST 50% of the equasion. The other 50% is proper marketing. However, if you start your business in "red ocean" territory, you're going to have a VERY difficult time making it. (Ex. Starting a web hosting business when everyone will outcompete you unless you own several datacenters and can properly market and compete with Amazon, Google, and GoDaddy, and NameCheap, while pulling in $50 per year for each account.)

 

You want to find your "blue ocean". (See: https://www.blueoceanstrategy.com/what-is-blue-ocean-strategy/) In order to do that, you want low competition, and the ability to leverage the fundamental basis of economics: that of supply and demand. So, the OP has a VERY important question: where do we easily see what's in low supply, with high demand?

 

I personally don't know the answer to that question, but we should ask Udemy support through Live Chat. If we fill the void by teaching courses in what we know best, we'll help others learn things well, alledgedly get high reviews because we're knowledgable in the topic, and we can all make more sales this way. If we all ask Udemy for that feature (assuming they don't have it), then then they'll probably write one into existance because there's high demand, and no supply for the feature at this time.

 

EDIT:

People, please stay on topic. Below is a copy and paste of the OP which says NOTHING at all about him wanting to create a course in something he's not proficient at. Assuming the worse in people is not only off topic, but downright unprofessional.

 

Opening Post:

Dear Sir, 

                  I have searched a lot on udemy insight but have not found any courses which are low in number and high in demand. 

   Can you please let me know as to which subjects are low in number and high in demand?

                                                                                    Regards

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Re: low number of courses and high demand

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ALWAYS pick course topics in which you have proficiency and professionalism. Because if you don't do this, this is what will happen -

  1. So you pick a topic that has high demand and low number of courses.
  2. HOWEVER, you have no knowledge in this topic
  3. You are now determined to make a course on this just because of the high demand and the low number of courses.
  4. You somehow make a course looking at blogs, videos, etc...

    -------------------THIS IS WHEN IT GETS THE WORST----------------------

  1. You publish the course
  2. YOU GET BAD RATINGS, WHY?? Because students are looking for professionals to learn from. If you made the course as specified above, you won't know what the necessary things are that are required for this topic. So, you will end up with teaching students un-important things and you might leave out the important topics. 
  3. Students can clearly state all of this in their review
  4. MOST LIKELY, no one will want to buy your course because of these ratings.

SO MAKE COURSES ONLY WITH TOPICS IN WHICH YOU HAVE PROFICIENCY AND PROFESSIONALISM

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Re: low number of courses and high demand

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@kakakamal12 

I think this is the wrong approach to creating a course. Your first question should be: what am I an expert in? Then, research this topic and see the demand. What if "cooking southern French cuisine" is a hot topic with high demand, would you be qualified to teach it? 

Also, high demand and high course numbers doesn't mean you can't compete, it just means you have to offer something unique and high quality.  

Greg Reverdiau - Airplane and Drone Training
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Re: low number of courses and high demand

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@kakakamal12 What is your specialism? Whatever it is then this is the topic you should be teaching. 

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Re: low number of courses and high demand

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I disagree with the approach the others have stated. As a businessman, I find that having a quality product or service is AT MOST 50% of the equasion. The other 50% is proper marketing. However, if you start your business in "red ocean" territory, you're going to have a VERY difficult time making it. (Ex. Starting a web hosting business when everyone will outcompete you unless you own several datacenters and can properly market and compete with Amazon, Google, and GoDaddy, and NameCheap, while pulling in $50 per year for each account.)

 

You want to find your "blue ocean". (See: https://www.blueoceanstrategy.com/what-is-blue-ocean-strategy/) In order to do that, you want low competition, and the ability to leverage the fundamental basis of economics: that of supply and demand. So, the OP has a VERY important question: where do we easily see what's in low supply, with high demand?

 

I personally don't know the answer to that question, but we should ask Udemy support through Live Chat. If we fill the void by teaching courses in what we know best, we'll help others learn things well, alledgedly get high reviews because we're knowledgable in the topic, and we can all make more sales this way. If we all ask Udemy for that feature (assuming they don't have it), then then they'll probably write one into existance because there's high demand, and no supply for the feature at this time.

 

EDIT:

People, please stay on topic. Below is a copy and paste of the OP which says NOTHING at all about him wanting to create a course in something he's not proficient at. Assuming the worse in people is not only off topic, but downright unprofessional.

 

Opening Post:

Dear Sir, 

                  I have searched a lot on udemy insight but have not found any courses which are low in number and high in demand. 

   Can you please let me know as to which subjects are low in number and high in demand?

                                                                                    Regards

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Re: low number of courses and high demand

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@RickMacGillis , I think your approach still doesn't account for what you are an expert at. What if high demand/low supply is training brain surgeons on a specific operation. Do you have the knowledge to create and teach a course? Or are you just cashing in by giving incorrect information in a course? 

I see so many people trying to teach a product in demand but have no background in the topic, it's a bit scary IMO. 

Greg Reverdiau - Airplane and Drone Training
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Re: low number of courses and high demand

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@RickMacGillis 

This is exactly the advice that two of us gave (teach something you're an expert in, don't just look for a topic that's in high demand) and you replied that you "disagreed with the approach the other two stated". So I'm not sure what you disagreed about then. 
And you will be amazed. There are a LOT of people making courses about things they know nothing about. Or rather don't have any expertise in. 

Greg Reverdiau - Airplane and Drone Training
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Re: low number of courses and high demand

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"And you will be amazed. There are a LOT of people making courses about things they know nothing about. Or rather don't have any expertise in. 

Greg Reverdiau - Airplane and Drone Training"
 
Wait. You're speaking from experience? Ironic, but I never thought about it that way. Why do you tell people not to teach something they're inexperienced at, if you're doing the same thing?
 
Anyway, what I was remarking on was that the existing responses stated that you should think of what you're an expert in, and then see if it's in demand. However, I might not realize that my expertise as a Reiki healer is useful ON UDEMY for people, and I might not think in that direction. I can ride a bike and drive a car, but I wouldn't think to look up interest in those and would like to see the demand for things in a list so t jogs my memory.
 
Some examples from other rsponses:
@GregReverdiau: "I think this is the wrong approach to creating a course. Your first question should be: what am I an expert in? Then, research this topic and see the demand."
 
I swear there was another response from someone when I posted my answer, but I can't find it. Perhaps they removed it. After I wrote my original answer, I saw  @DYay2810 post a bunch of off-topic stuff talking about why people should only teach courses they're knowledgable in.
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Re: low number of courses and high demand

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@RickMacGillis  hahaha, thanks a good chuckle. Have a great weekend. 

Greg Reverdiau - Airplane and Drone Training
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@GregReverdiau wrote:

@RickMacGillis  hahaha, thanks a good chuckle. Have a great weekend. 


I'm not sure what you found funny, but to each their own I guess.

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Re: low number of courses and high demand

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ALWAYS pick course topics in which you have proficiency and professionalism. Because if you don't do this, this is what will happen -

  1. So you pick a topic that has high demand and low number of courses.
  2. HOWEVER, you have no knowledge in this topic
  3. You are now determined to make a course on this just because of the high demand and the low number of courses.
  4. You somehow make a course looking at blogs, videos, etc...

    -------------------THIS IS WHEN IT GETS THE WORST----------------------

  1. You publish the course
  2. YOU GET BAD RATINGS, WHY?? Because students are looking for professionals to learn from. If you made the course as specified above, you won't know what the necessary things are that are required for this topic. So, you will end up with teaching students un-important things and you might leave out the important topics. 
  3. Students can clearly state all of this in their review
  4. MOST LIKELY, no one will want to buy your course because of these ratings.

SO MAKE COURSES ONLY WITH TOPICS IN WHICH YOU HAVE PROFICIENCY AND PROFESSIONALISM

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